Book review: The Last Resort – A Memoir of Zimbabwe by Douglas Rogers

The tidying up of The Phraser continues. This, rearranged so it reads better, was the first book I reviewed.

The Phraser

The Last Resort - A Memoir of Zimbabwe by Douglas Rogers The Last Resort – A Memoir of Zimbabwe by Douglas Rogers

This memoir covers eight years in a country that is finger-nailed to a crumbling cliff. It should be a tough read…but it isn’t.

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Review: Don McCullin Photography Exhibition at Tate Britain

At the entrance to the exhibition of Don McCullin's photographs at Tate Britain, London

At the entrance to the exhibition of Don McCullin’s photographs at Tate Britain, London

Black and white and not very big, each frame – and there are rooms of them – shows what it felt like to be there. Not easy most of the time, but so compelling.

The exhibition of photographs taken by Don McCullin over the last sixty years is on at the Tate Britain in London until 6 May 2019. I went last week…so did plenty of others.

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Film Review: Men In Black³

During my update of The Phraser – and my filing of everything under the new menu system – I came across this review of Men In Black³ from 2012. I remember the film, and that writing the review made me smile – I hope you enjoy it…even if you never get to see the film. (I have made a few minor changes to the piece but nothing much.)

The Phraser

Men in Black 3, starring Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones and Josh Brolin Men in Black 3, starring Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones and Josh Brolin

This is a film with plenty of splash – perfect for an imagination wilted by supermarket aisles or the daily commute.

The first MIB (Men in Black) film was made in 1997, the second in 2002 and the third in 2012.

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Review: A Plague of Caterpillars – A Return to the African Bush by Nigel Barley

A Plague of Caterpillars - A Return to the African Bush by Nigel Barley

A Plague of Caterpillars – A Return to the African Bush by Nigel Barley

This book was sent to me as a review copy.

He is back!

This is the second part of The Innocent Anthropologist’s adventures in the land of the Dowayo in Cameroon.

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Book Review: The Innocent Anthropologist – Notes from a Mud Hut by Nigel Barley

The Innocent Anthropologist - Notes from a Mud Hut by Nigel Barley

The Innocent Anthropologist – Notes from a Mud Hut by Nigel Barley

This book was sent to me as a review copy.

The Innocent Anthropologist is a cultural dive into the deep end.

Written in the early 1980s by anthropologist Nigel Barley, it describes the author’s first attempt at fieldwork in Africa. The result, built around us and others, is shocking and funny, and bashed about with the perils of first hand observation. Continue reading

Fresh Food in Camden Lock Market’s West Yard

Here’s another piece on Camden Lock Market’s West Yard. It was written in 2012 after a visit to the food stalls. I’d love to know if anyone has fresh news of the food there. There was such a great atmosphere when I visited.

The Phraser

Fresh food in Camden Lock Market's West Yard Fresh food in Camden Lock Market’s West Yard

The food stalls in the West Yard of Camden Lock Market last Friday were all sunshine and service. It was a world food experience – a gap year in a lunch-hour…minus the alcohol.

If you have a London ‘to-do’ list that burst with parks, palaces, museums and big stores perhaps you might add Camden Market. It’s a day out to stretch the senses – a break from the big brands.

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Film Review: Angels’ Share – rich with real laughter

Do you remember this film? I found this review back in the early pages of The Phraser so I’ve dusted it off, and am showing it again. The film made me smile so much the first time.

The Phraser

Angels' Share - a film directed by Ken Loach Angels’ Share – a film directed by Ken Loach

Angels’ Share introduces us to a group of Glasgow’s young offenders as they spiral down into nowhere…and then it adds hope, urgent, illogical hope.

It’s a ninety minute diamond of a film, with an age-restriction of 15, some on-your-nose violence, and great publicity for whisky and Irn-Bru. It also shows the meaning of useful compassion, and it feels real.

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